Jun 24, 2014

With the release of Medical Compliance Starts at Birth—the third video in a series highlighting the recent analysis from Professor Heckman and colleagues that shows the substantial positive impact of quality early childhood development on adult health—the full collection of resources designed to help you use this research is now available:

 

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If there are additional materials that you would find helpful, please let us know at info@heckmanequation.org.

 

Thank you.

by Max  |  May 06, 2014
The following essay was written by Max, a seventh grader at Lausanne Collegiate School in Memphis, Tennessee. Each year, the middle school students at Lausanne Collegiate School do a Living Museum project in which they answer an important...
by Heckman Equation  |  Mar 27, 2014
The Perry Preschool study has shown that high-quality early development programs for disadvantaged children can lead to better education, social and economic outcomes for individuals and society. New research from Professor Heckman and colleagues...
by Heckman Equation  |  Jan 28, 2014
Professor Heckman issued the following statement in response to the State of the Union address on January 28, 2014.   “It’s heartening to see that for two years early childhood education has been a prominent part of...
by Heckman Equation  |  Nov 12, 2013
Professor Heckman issued the following statement today in response to the introduction of the bipartisan Strong Start for America's Children Act.   “The Strong Start for America's Children Act is an...
by James J. Heckman  |  Jul 15, 2013
The following is an excerpt from an article that first appeared in The New York Times on September 15, 2013.     What’s missing in the current debate over economic...
by Heckman Equation  |  Jul 08, 2013
Watch Professor Heckman in Are We Crazy About Our Kids?, a pre-release from the forthcoming documentary series produced by California Newsreel, The Raising of America, which makes a compelling case for using quality early childhood development to...
Investing in quality early childhood development for disadvantaged children from birth through age 5 will help prevent achievement deficits and produce better education, health, social and economic outcomes. Such investments will reduce the need for costly remediation and social spending while increasing the value, productivity and earning potential of individuals. In fact, every dollar invested in quality early childhood development for disadvantaged children produces a 7 percent to 10 percent return, per child, per year.
- Professor James Heckman